Friday, March 28, 2008


March 25, 2008The White Book, by Ken Mansfield
Posted on Joe Wikert's Publishing 2020 Blog


Just when you thought you had read and seen everything about The Beatles... Author Ken Mansfield provides one of the more entertaining and fascinating books about the Fab Four in years.


The White Book isn't just another Beatles book because Mansfield isn't just another music critic with a new angle; he's the guy who used to run the U.S. arm of Apple Records, the label started by The Beatles.


The White Book is loaded with stories and photos that I've never seen before, and believe me when I tell you I've gone through my share of Beatles books. In addition to the many unique photos of the band, there are also pictures of memorabilia and letters. It was interesting to read not just the facts about each event/document but Mansfield's behind-the-scenes explanations, the real insider's perspective.


Mansfield's music experience isn't limited to The Beatles and neither is the coverage in this book. He dedicates the latter part of the book to his work with other big names such as James Taylor, Waylon Jennings, David Cassidy and several others. The White Book is a wonderful book and one that every Beatle fan needs for their collection.


Average Joe loves "The White Book"

March 25, 2008
The White Book, by Ken Mansfield

Just when you thought you had read and seen everything about The Beatles... Author Ken Mansfield provides one of the more entertaining and fascinating books about the Fab Four in years. The White Book isn't just another Beatles book because Mansfield isn't just another music critic with a new angle; he's the guy who used to run the U.S. arm of Apple Records, the label started by The Beatles.

The White Book is loaded with stories and photos that I've never seen before, and believe me when I tell you I've gone through my share of Beatles books. In addition to the many unique photos of the band, there are also pictures of memorabilia and letters. It was interesting to read not just the facts about each event/document but Mansfield's behind-the-scenes explanations, the real insider's perspective.

Mansfield's music experience isn't limited to The Beatles and neither is the coverage in this book. He dedicates the latter part of the book to his work with other big names such as James Taylor, Waylon Jennings, David Cassidy and several others. The White Book is a wonderful book and one that every Beatle fan needs for their collection.

Posted on Joe Wickert's Publishing 2020 Blog.

Thursday, March 27, 2008

Beatle buddies offer feast for The Fest


Nancy Lee Andrews and Ken Mansfield provide feast for The Fest

Nancy Lee Andrews and Ken Mansfield, two people who were well-acquainted with The Beatles, will provide a feast for Beatles fans this weekend.

The two will headline the 34th New York Metro Fest for Beatles Fans this weekend. The festival takes place at the New Jersey Crowne Plaza Hotel in Secaucus. More than 6,000 fans are expected for the three-day extravaganza, which also includes Pattie Boyd Harrison, Denny Laine, Denny Seiwell and Laurence Juber.

Photographer Nancy Lee Andrews, who was Ringo Starr's former girlfriend and fiance, will be promoting A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay of the 1970s. (Dalton Watson Fine Books, $69.99)

Mansfield, the former U.S. Manager for Apple Records, will be on hand to promote his new all-music tome, The White Book (Thomas Nelson, $22.95).

It will be a first-time Fest appearance for both individuals.

The festival will be held from March 28 through 30. Registration is $32 for Friday and $47 for Saturday or Sunday. Children 6 through 12 get in for half price; children under 5 are free. Special rates are available for multiple days. For more information, call 1-866-THE-FEST, or visit www.thefest.com.

Beatle buddies offer feast for The Fest




Ken Mansfield and Nancy Lee Andrews, two people who were well-acquainted with The Beatles, will provide a feast for Beatles fans this weekend at a popular annual festival.

The two will headline the 34th New York Metro Fest for Beatles Fans this weekend. The festival starts Friday, March 28 at the New Jersey Crowne Plaza Hotel in Secaucus. More than 6,000 fans are expected for the three-day extravaganza, which also includes Pattie Boyd Harrison, Denny Laine, Denny Seiwell and Laurence Juber.

Mansfield, the former U.S. Manager for Apple Records, will be on hand to promote his new all-music tome, The White Book (Thomas Nelson, $22.95).

Photographer Nancy Lee Andrews, who was Ringo Starr's former girlfriend and fiance, will be promoting A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay of the 1970s. (Dalton Watson Fine Books, $69.99)

It will be a first-time Fest appearance for the two.

The festival will be held from March 28 through 30. Registration is $32 for Friday and $47 for Saturday or Sunday. Children 6 through 12 get in for half price; children under 5 are free. Special rates are available for multiple days. For more information, call 1-866-THE-FEST, or visit www.thefest.com.

Andrews and Pang team up for special photo exhibit



Rock Star Gallery features photo exhibition and book signing for Beatle women


Authors May Pang and Nancy Lee Andrews, both long time companions of John Lennon and Ringo Starr, will hold an exhibition and book signing at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Nancy Lee Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history. May Pang was requested to become John Lennon’s companion in June of 1973. Pang’s memoir recounts stories of her former lover in vivid detail.

Pang and Andrews are exhibiting never before seen photos of John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr on Friday, April 11, 2008 6-9 p.m. Pang and Andrews will also hold a book signing and story hour on Saturday April 12, 2008 1-3 p.m. The photos and books will be for sale. Both events are open to the public and will be held at Rock Star Gallery, located next to Crate and Barrel in Kierland Commons at 15220 N. Scottsdale Road, suite 160 Scottsdale, Arizona 85254.

Andrews’ book A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll (Dalton Watson Fine Books) a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr and other icons of the ‘70s while Pang is promoting Instamatic Karma (St. Martin's Press), chronicling her 18-month relationship with John Lennon.

To R.S.V.P for these events please contact Donna Dunn at (480) 275-4501 or by e-mail at ddunn@rockstargallery.net.

Tuesday, March 25, 2008





Ken Mansfield headlines 1968 Week

Ken Mansfield, former U.S. Manager for Apple Records, is heading up an all-star cast of authors to commemorate the watershed year of 1968.

Billed as "Revolution '68: How the Beatles Reflected a Rebellious Year," Mansfield will appear with authors Charles Kaiser, Devin McKinney and Anthony DeCurtis at New York City's Barnes and Noble, 2289 Broadway at 82nd Street. The event starts at 7 p.m. and will be followed by a signing. Mansfield will be signing copies of his all-music tome The White Book (Thomas Nelson, $22.95). Seating is limited to the first 100 people.


Mansfield has worked with some of the biggest giants in the rock 'n roll and the country music genres. As the U.S. manager of the Apple Records label, he was invited by his bosses, The Beatles to be among only a handful of eyewitnesses to catch their last-ever gig on the rooftop of their London headquarters on January 30, 1969. He was a loyal employee and companion to John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr both during the band years and well after their breakup in 1970. He was present when they composed some of their most enduring tunes. As a record label exec and Grammy Award-winning producer, he also worked on the marketing, promotion and production of dozens of top-selling artists, such as the Beach Boys, and was also a major player in country music in the 1970s as producer of choice of the groundbreaking Outlaw movement, whose impact is still felt in the genre to this very day.

Through exclusive, never-before-seen photos and personal stories, Mansfield - one of the very last Fab Four insiders to pen a book - offers a compelling memoir that delves into his life in the 1960s and '70s and his unique partnership with The Beatles and other musicians who had orbited their world, from James Taylor to Harry Nilsson. It also includes fleeting, yet unforgettable encounters with Mama Cass Elliott, Eric Clapton, Donovan, Glen Campbell and Dolly Parton. As observer, friend and colleague, Mansfield attended Beatles recording sessions, partied in their swimming pools, took their irate calls, witnessed the madness of Beatlemania, and publicized their success. Entertaining, historically accurate, and illuminating a side of the Fab Four known only to a few like Mansfield, The White Book shines fresh light on the true characters behind the cultural phenomena that revolutionized a generation.

Nancy Lee Andrews takes on The Wiseguy



Nancy Lee Andrews on the radio in New York this Wednesday

Photographer Nancy Lee Andrews will appear on The Wiseguy Show this Wednesday, March 26 to to talk about her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll. The comedy talk show is hosted by actor Vinny Pastore (“Big Pussy” from The Sopranos,) along with several of his Italian “wiseguy” cohorts. It airs live across America on Wednesday, 6 to 9 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, plus a replay on Saturday at 4 p.m. On Sirius Raw Dog Channel 104. It is executive produced by Steven Van Zandt from The Sopranos and Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band.

Also, an exhibition of Andrews's photo portraits of musicians from the 1970s selected from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll will be on view at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale on April 12, 2008, The Ingleside Inn and Melvyn's in Palm Springs on April 13-14, the June Kelly Gallery in SoHo from June 11-14 and at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville from July 13 to August 31.

For more information on A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, visit www.daltonwatson.com.


Ken Mansfield headlines 1968 week in NYC

www.fabwhitebook.com

1968 WEEK

Barnes & Noble Bookstore Upper Westside



Tuesday, March 25 at 7pm

REVOLUTION ‘68:

How The Beatles Reflected a Rebellious Year

Charles Kaiser (1968 in America), First U.S. Manager of Apple Records Ken Mansfield (The White Book), Devin McKinney

(Magic Circles: The Beatles in Dream and History),

and music critic Anthony DeCurtis (In Other Words:

Artists Talk About Life and Work)


Wednesday, March 26 at 7pm

POLITICS & PASSION ’68:

Robert Kennedy’s Race for President

New York Times columnist Bob Herbert, writer Pete Hamill,

Newsweek’s Evan Thomas (Robert F. Kennedy: His Life),

and JFK and RFK advisor and former senator Harris Wofford

(Of Kennedys and Kings)


Thursday, March 27 at 7pm

POWER ’68:

Revisiting the Black Power Movement

Peniel E. Joseph (Waiting ‘Til the Midnight Hour:

A Narrative History of Black Power in America),

1968 Olympic gold medalist Tommie Smith (Silent Gesture),

Herb Boyd (Baldwin’s Harlem) and Michael Honey

(Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike,

Martin Luther King’s Last Campaign)


All events are free and open to the public. No reservations. Seating is limited.

For more information call 212-721-5282.


BARNES & NOBLE

2289 BROADWAY at 82ND Street

NEW YORK CITY

Monday, March 24, 2008

Q & A with Christopher Keane



Romancing the A-List Stars

Q & A with author/screenwriter Christopher Keane

Writer Chris Keane has penned books that have been made into movies and series, The Hunter (Paramount) and The Huntress (TV series on USA Network), along with teaching at Harvard and NYU and writing features. He came to the conclusion that the best way by far to get you book or screenplay into production is to place the greatest amount of focus on the central character. After all, it only makes sense. Agents and managers want their A-list clients to star in movies that will enhance their careers. And so Chris wrote Romancing The A-List. This book follows his international best-selling book, How To Write A Selling Screenplay.

Keane, the author of 14 books and numerous screenplays, offers his valuable insight into the world of Hollywood, the movie industry and how far some stars will go to make a point in this exclusive Q & A.

Q: Chris, you've written several books on how to write and sell screenplays. What's the particular focus of Romancing the A-List?

CK: The idea behind it is simple. After spending time in the movie world you see pictures being made for all sorts of reasons: The financing is available. The studio has to make it (or start it) before the fiscal year is up so that they can ask the parent company for more dough next year. Pictures are made because they can be. The producer/director is a joy to work with, meaning there's a quiet set, and the pictures he or she has made came in on time and on or under budget. But mainly, by a large margin, it's who's in it. Star power reigns. Stars want starring roles that will enhance their careers. The best way to for that to happen is for the screenwriter to pen a juicy main part, a powerful character that drives the story, the picture and the box office. Once a screenwriter gets that main character down the rest of the characters, the story, the beats, etc., all rise to that level.

Q: What inspired you to write this book?

CK: I've been teaching a course or two every semester for years, at Emerson, Harvard, Northeastern, LMU, wherever I happened to be. My students suggested that I write all this down in a book. I hemmed and hawed for a while. I owed a publisher a book or a producer a script, so I didn't have any real incentive at the moment. This one student kept pushing. One time she said, “If you write the book we won't call you for help at two o'clock in the morning.” The next day I was on it. Well, that's not the whole story. I love to learn and love to teach, so it was a way to learn a whole lot more about this main character/driver and to share it with whomever is interested out there.

Q: Everybody wants to write a screenplay because they think it's a glamorous business. Give us a dose of reality about the movie industry.

CK: You've got to be very good to make a living as a writer in this business. You have to be willing to spend sometimes years before you hit. It's the sticktuitiveness within that makes the difference. I don't think you should ever give up if you're a committed writer. So you drive cabs or wait on tables, so what? Do it. Otherwise, you'll fall away like all the others and maybe spend the rest of your life wondering if you spent enough time before you bailed.

Q: How has the movie industry changed when you first entered the business in the late '70s?

CK: When I came in I was 21, just got out of college and had written a book that Steve McQueen made into The Hunter, his last picture before he died. I was in culture shock from the whole thing. I remember not really paying attention to much at all; the business, the deals. I had an agent and a lawyer who took care of that for me. I just lived with my subject, a bounty hunter, his family, and half the criminal element of Southern California. I wasn't so concerned with deals as I am now. I thought it was a big wonderful experience. Ignorance is bliss. Now I check the trades and hear conversations tinged with desperation more than I had back then. It's more global now, with more possibilities. The indie market is greater, the Internet is the new delivery system. It was cozier then.

Q: Writing a book and writing a screenplay appear to be two separate art forms. You've done both. Can you briefly explain the difference?

CK: In a book you get to explore, in words, the inner life of the character. In a screenplay you can't see thought except as it generates action. I prefer neither. For me, the subject matter determines the form.

Q: It's been said that the screenwriter is the least respected person on the totem pole in Hollywood. Can you cite an example of something that's happened to you first-hand to illustrate that point?

CK: I was with a top flight agency for a long time and had a project that later became a series. I was told that because the agency wanted to sign a production company that wanted my project in return for signing, I was told I would have to sit way in the back of the bus. I left the agency.

Q: Didn't Steve McQueen give you some acting advice on the set of The Hunter?

CK: Somehow I talked my way into playing a part in the movie, of a bailbondsman, in a scene with Steve and Eli Wallach. I was nervous. I was supposed to convince Steve's character, a bounty hunter, to go to Mexico to pick up some bad character. The scene took place in a diner. It was maybe the fourth take (because I was going up on my lines) when Steve took me aside and said, “Don't be so hard on yourself. You're hard on yourself, aren't you?” I nodded. “You're doing great. Pretend you're having fun.” So I did and on the next take the director locked it in.” A lot of people applauded, but I suspect it wasn't the performance but that I gotten through it.” I am hard on myself.

Q: Kevin Costner once said that the screenwriter's first script is always his/hers best because they put so much time and effort into their debut. Do you agree with that sentiment?

CK: The first script is when you stick your hands into the putty and come out with something. It's the first raw experience of creating in a new form. It takes a reorientation into how to put a movie on a page. A lot of people think the person who comes up with the story should have first position. It's actually the person who develops the story and puts in on the page, in 100 pages, that gets first position. That's the hard work. The WGA mandates that the screenplay is worth 75 percent of the credit/profits and the story 25 percent. In my first screenplay I decided to choose as a subject a thriller in the streets of New York. I told somebody I could write a screenplay in one day, and did. Almost. I got through eighty-seven pages before I fell asleep. I read it the next day. It was so bad I couldn't finish it. The second one was about a team of super heist artists who detonated a massive bomb ten miles off the coast of Palm Beach, Florida and engineered the explosion to send a fairly good sized tidal wave to plow over Palm Beach, creating enough chaos so that the heist team could knock over the Worth Avenue banks via helicopters which dropped them, in their wet suits, into the locations. Whew. That was also a stinker. But valuable because I learned from my mistakes. I also learned a BIG LESSON from someone who told me if I wanted to be a screenwriter to promise myself that I would read two screenplays a week for the next six months. I did. That was the most valuable lesson I ever learned. I learned what this strange form was all about, from the pros. If would be screenwriters don't burn through a ton of screenplays they're dead before they start.

Q: What makes for a compelling character on the screen and how do you go about developing that character?

CK: A compelling character for me is one who I have not seen before, a true original, but with whom I can identify, on an emotional level. A character that upsets my expectations. A character that I can't wait to get to in the morning to see what he or she is going to do next, within reason. When I start a new project, whether it's a WGA job or a spec, I have an idea for the story and/or the main character. It doesn't matter what comes first. It is important to remember that character drives story rather than the other way around. I make sure the main character is in real trouble right from the start. Something's very wrong with his/her life and it's going to get worse. Henry James said a hundred and some-odd years ago that if you don't put your main character in the most critical situation he or she has ever encountered, THE STORY IS NOT WORTH TELLING. Nothing short of a extraordinarily screwed up, driven, fascinating, dynamic main character is going to attract A-List talent. Attracting A-List actors is, by far, the best way to get a movie made. Period. I write at length, with tons of examples, about this subject in the new book, Romancing The A-List: Writing the Script The Big Stars Want to Make.

Q: Without naming names, what's the most outrageous thing you've ever seen an actor or actress do?

CK: I saw the biggest box office star in the world at the time shoot a beautiful high-back Victorian-era chair with .45, his purpose being the need to kill the aura of a director he had just fired. The director had been sitting in the chair a moment before. The star told him to get up and move out of the way; he wasn't worth killing for real. I tell the whole story of this A-List star in the forward to a book I wrote a few years ago, How to Write a Selling Screenplay.

Romancing the A-List: Writing the Script The Big Stars Want to Make will be published by Michael Wiese Productions on April 1. The 190-page book can be pre-ordered by going to www.amazon.com.

Saturday, March 22, 2008

Himmelstein subscribes to the A-List


Pre-order Romancing The A-List

"Here's the difference between Romancing the A-List and every other screenwriting book clogging the shelf: Chris Keane has not only been through the movie and TV wars he's still engaged in them. His insights aren't dated or theoretical -- they're as real as the studio notes he got last week. Even more impressive, he doesn't just linger on his successes. He's confident enough to analyze his failures and those hard-earned lessons are some of the most instructive in the book."

David Himmelstein, screenwriter, Power, Talent For The Game, Village of the Damned

Christopher Keane finds the passion


Get Keane on passion

When a new or veteran screenwriter comes to me for help, the first question I ask is this:

What's the story you need to tell?

The question goes right to the heart of the writer's passion, which to me is the crucial ingredient in any script. After twenty years writing and teaching in the movie business, I can tell the difference between someone's passion to write a story and a mild interest in getting into the industry.


What about the changing face of the movie business — in The New Hollywood? Bring your passion, yes, but the rules have changed. Hollywood draws from the provinces. Studio pictures fail where scripts from beyond Hollywood's borders prevail. Why? And how? And why are so-called smaller movies drawing top actors and directors, paying the big dollars, winning the big awards?

In The New Hollywood, subject matter defies industry convention and wisdom. While the top producers wrangle for big budget features, everyone else climbs outside the Hollywood box looking for dynamic product.

How do you tap that source? Why are story preparation and story beats the driving forces behind great scripts? How do you NOT fall into the flat character hole? How do capitalize on your own passion for a story, rather than derivative junk, to bring your script home?

When Kyle Rankin (co-director of 2003's Project Greenlight, shooting this spring in Austin, Texas) walked into my class four years ago, a fire burned. Kyle had a story to tell. He wanted to get the story out, and in class he did, and now he's launched a career.


It's all about passion and canniness and paying attention to a changing Hollywood. Kyle didn't write the movie he thought Hollywood might want to see. He wrote the story he needed to tell. He had the passion and I had the tools to help him turn the story into a knockout screenplay, which he then made into a movie.


I bring the same tools to my Script Analysis and into my Screenwriting Workshops. You bring the passion and I'll bring the nuts and bolts and together we'll build the world of your screenplay.

Unlike some teachers who do not write for the movie business, I am a working screenwriter. I'm currently writing a script for Samuel L. Jackson. I just finished an action comedy optioned by Michael Schiffer's Ballpark Productions. I had a series on last year off one of my books (The Huntress USA Network). And when all this is cleared out, there's a family-in-crisis story I'm dying to write.

If you've got the passion to tell a story that lives within you, bring it and we'll find a way to make it happen.

For more information on Christopher Keane's now book Romancing the A-List, go to www.keanewords.com or www.amazon.com.

Friday, March 21, 2008

The "Dice" Man Cometh to Vancouver

Dice rolling through town

The R-rated comedian not the same person off the stage

Guy MacPherson – VANCOUVER PROVINCE



Thursday, March 06, 2008



ON STAGE: Andrew "Dice" Clay

Where: River Rock Show Theatre, Richmond

When: Friday at 8 p.m.

Tickets: $48.50-$58.50 at Ticketmaster

It always seems the most popular comedians are the ones least liked by everyone you know.

Try finding a Dane Cook or Larry the Cable Guy fan. It's almost impossible. Yet they sell out arenas while our favourites are playing to half-filled clubs. Makes no sense. It's like Yogi Berra once said about a popular restaurant: "Nobody goes there anymore, it's too crowded."

There was a time, not too long ago, when an R-rated Fonzie clone was king of the comedy hill. Andrew "Dice" Clay broke all kinds of attendance records, all the while being despised by the press, his fellow comedians and the entertainment industry as a whole for his jingoistic, sexist and racist act.

"Everybody went against me," he says from his home in Los Angeles. "But the more they went against me, the more the fans were chanting my name. It was a crazy thing."

While Dice is clearly a character Clay has created, he admits it has him confused sometimes.

"It's hard even after all these years to explain who I am off the stage," he says. "It's puzzled everybody, including myself, because I am from Brooklyn, I do have a Brooklyn attitude."

The difference, he says, is he doesn't say the first thing that pops into his head when he sees a beautiful woman. "On stage I just say what people think and how they feel. And that's what makes them laugh. When you hit that button in somebody that they go, 'That's just what I was thinking!', that's what makes them laugh."

He still describes himself as an attack comic, but says his act is "less cartoonish" than it used to be.

"I've developed as a performer and the material is stronger and really truthful on stage," he says.

Clay, who's performing at the River Rock Show Theatre tomorrow, was never a big fan of comedy before first hitting the stage. He wanted to be a movie star. But instead of going to acting class, he started showcasing in comedy clubs, figuring that's where industry would see him.

His role models weren't Richard Pryor, George Carlin or Lenny Bruce, but Elvis Presley, Sylvester Stallone and Muhammed Ali.

"I decided I'll become the Elvis of stand-up," he says. "I will create that persona for people to have because it's been done on television, it's been done in movies, but it was never done as a stand-up comic. That why, as the career took off, there were more rhinestones on the leather, the collars were higher. That was all Elvis influenced. And it worked."

It sure did. Clay played just about every sports arena in America, often two or three nights at a time.

"You're talking anywhere from 45,000 to 60,000 people a weekend. I mean, it was ridiculous," he says.

After a 10-minute set that wowed promoters at the Pollstar Awards last month, there's talk of another arena tour, and Dice is appreciative. "It's really exciting. It's like lightning striking twice. I think I'll get to enjoy it a little more this time."

Of course, he's not all humility. Dice is still Dice: "I showed them why -- for all these years -- that I say I'm the best there is."

Sunday, March 16, 2008

Nancy Lee Andrews visits "Breakfast with the Beatles"


Nancy Lee Andrews drops by for "Breakfast"

Photographer Nancy Lee Andrews will appear on Q 104.3 FM's "Breakfast with the Beatles" on Sunday, March 16 to promote her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll. Host Ken Dashow's show airs from 8 to 10 a.m. EST. The show can also be heard on the station's Web site at http://www.q1043.com/ as well as through the site's podcast library.


A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr. Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

The book is rich in photos of tender moments with Ringo, his loving relationship with his children, his playfulness and their travels around the world. Her years with the famous Beatle drummer brought Andrews and her highly original and perceptive camerawork into the world of some of the greatest rock and roll and pop icons of the time, along with the women who loved them. Among many others appearing in the images and text of the book, in addition to Ringo and the late, great John Lennon and George Harrison, are Keith Moon, Bernie Taupin, Arlo Guthrie, Hoyt Axton and Eric Clapton, to name a few

A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll is being issued by Dalton Watson Fine Books (www.daltonwatson.com) in a limited edition of 2,500. Priced at $69, it contains 292 pages, 207 color and 98 black and white photos, numbered and signed by Andrews, in a slipcase. It will debut at The Fest for Beatles Fans 2008 at the Meadowlands Hotel in Secaucus, New Jersey from March 28-30, 2008. The author will be on hand at the hotel to autograph books on Friday, 5pm-midnight; Saturday, noon-midnight; and Sunday, noon-10:30 pm. A regular edition will be released in June, 2008 for $39. ISBN # 978-1-85443-235-3.

According to Andrews, “Ringo Starr was also ardent about photography. It was a huge part of our life.” They collaborated on two album covers, Ringo the 4th and Bad Boy, as well as the advertising shoot for his “Ringo” special.

An exhibition of Andrews’s photo portraits of musicians from the 1970s selected from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll will be on view at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. April 12, 2008; The Ingleside Inn and Melvyn’s in Palm Springs, Calif. April 13-14; the June Kelly Gallery in SoHo, New York from June 11-14 and at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville from July 13 to August 31. A national gallery and museum tour is being planned.

Have Breakfast with Nancy Lee Andrews




Have breakfast with Nancy Lee Andrews

Photographer Nancy Lee Andrews will appear on Q 104.3 FM's "Breakfast with the Beatles" on Sunday, March 16 to promote her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll. Host Ken Dashow's show airs from 8 to 10 a.m. EST. The show can also be heard on the station's Web site at http://www.q1043.com/ as well as through the site's podcast library.

A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr. Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

The book is rich in photos of tender moments with Ringo, his loving relationship with his children, his playfulness and their travels around the world. Her years with the famous Beatle drummer brought Andrews and her highly original and perceptive camerawork into the world of some of the greatest rock and roll and pop icons of the time, along with the women who loved them. Among many others appearing in the images and text of the book, in addition to Ringo and the late, great John Lennon and George Harrison, are Keith Moon, Bernie Taupin, Arlo Guthrie, Hoyt Axton and Eric Clapton, to name a few

A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll is being issued by Dalton Watson Fine Books (www.daltonwatson.com) in a limited edition of 2,500. Priced at $69, it contains 292 pages, 207 color and 98 black and white photos, numbered and signed by Andrews, in a slipcase. It will debut at The Fest for Beatles Fans 2008 at the Meadowlands Hotel in Secaucus, New Jersey from March 28-30, 2008. The author will be on hand at the hotel to autograph books on Friday, 5pm-midnight; Saturday, noon-midnight; and Sunday, noon-10:30 pm. A regular edition will be released in June, 2008 for $39. ISBN # 978-1-85443-235-3.

According to Andrews, “Ringo Starr was also ardent about photography. It was a huge part of our life.” They collaborated on two album covers, Ringo the 4th and Bad Boy, as well as the advertising shoot for his “Ringo” special.

An exhibition of Andrews’s photo portraits of musicians from the 1970s selected from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll will be on view at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. April 12, 2008; The Ingleside Inn and Melvyn’s in Palm Springs, Calif. April 13-14; the June Kelly Gallery in SoHo, New York from June 11-14 and at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville from July 13 to August 31. A national gallery and museum tour is being planned.

To order A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, go to www.daltonwatson.com.

Friday, March 14, 2008

Listen to this Nancy Lee Andrews interview




KMOX interview with Nancy Lee Andrews




KMOX 1120 a.m. in St. Louis, Missouri has posted its March 4 interview with Nancy Lee Andrews, who was the guest of The Carney Show. Andrews was promoting her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll. Go to http://kmox.com/The-Carney-Show/1670961 to listen to the interview.

A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll is a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr. She met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

The book is rich in photos of tender moments with Ringo, his loving relationship with his children, his playfulness and their travels around the world. Her years with the famous Beatle drummer brought Andrews and her highly original and perceptive camerawork into the world of some of the greatest rock and roll and pop icons of the time, along with the women who loved them. Among many others appearing in the images and text of the book, in addition to Ringo and the late, great John Lennon and George Harrison, are Keith Moon, Bob Dylan, The Band, Donovan, Pattie Boyd and Eric Clapton, to name a few.

A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll is being issued by Dalton Watson Fine Books (www.daltonwatson.com) in a limited edition of 2,500. Priced at $69, it contains 292 pages, 207 color and 98 black and white photos, numbered and signed by Andrews, in a slipcase. It will debut at The Fest for Beatles Fans 2008 at the Meadowlands Hotel in Secaucus, New Jersey from March 28-30, 2008. The author will be on hand at the hotel to autograph books on Friday, 5 pm-midnight; Saturday, noon-midnight; and Sunday, noon-10:30 pm. A regular edition will be released in June, 2008 for $39.

An exhibition of Andrews’s photo portraits of musicians from the 1970s selected from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll will be on view at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. April 12, 2008; The Ingleside Inn and Melvyn’s in Palm Springs, Calif. April 13-14; the June Kelly Gallery in SoHo, New York from June 11-14 and at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville from July 13 to August 31. A national gallery and museum tour is being planned.

For more information or to order A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, go to http://www.daltonwatson.com/.

Thursday, March 13, 2008

Breakfast with Ken Mansfield

www.jacksonvillechapel.org or www.fabwhitebook.com

Ken Mansfield heads up Good Friday Breakfast on March 21

Grammy-winning producer, author, record executive and former U.S. Manager of the Beatles' Apple Records label, Ken Mansfield is heading up this year's Annual Good Friday Men's Breakfast in Parsippany, NJ on Friday, March 21. The breakfast will take place at the Sheraton Parsippany, 199 Smith Road, in Parsippany. The two-hour event starts at 7:30 a.m. and is hosted by The Men of Jacksonville Chapel. The cost is $25 a person.

Mansfield has worked with some of the biggest giants in the rock 'n roll and the country music genres. As the U.S. manager of the Apple Records label, he was invited by his bosses, The Beatles to be among only a handful of eyewitnesses to catch their last-ever gig on the rooftop of their London headquarters on January 30, 1969. He was a loyal employee and companion to John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr both during the band years and well after their breakup in 1970. He was present when they composed some of their most enduring tunes. He worked on the marketing, promotion and production of dozens of top-selling artists, such as the Beach Boys, Glen Campbell, The Band, Judy Garland, The Four Freshmen, Lou Rawls, Andy Williams, David Cassidy, Dolly Parton and the Flying Burrito Brothers. Mansfield was also a major player in country music in the 1970s as producer of choice of the groundbreaking Outlaw movement, whose impact is still felt in the genre to this very day.

The Beatles adventure and Ken Mansfield's personal “long and winding road” to salvation form an intriguing central testimony theme. His openness about his rise and fall from the heights of fame and decadence into the loving and forgiving arms of a real savior breaks down barriers for the unbelievers and instills new faith into the lives of struggling believers, making this breakfast a special feast.

For more information on the Jacksonville Chapel's Annual Good Friday Men's Breafast, call (973) 334-6657 or visit www.jacksonvillechapel.org to register online.




Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Breakfast with Nancy Lee Andrews


Nancy Lee Andrews to appear "Breakfast with the Beatles" Sunday, March 16


Photographer Nancy Lee Andrews will appear on Q 104.3 FM's "Breakfast with the Beatles" on Sunday, March 16 to promote her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll. Host Ken Dashow's show airs from 8 to 10 a.m. EST. The show can also be heard on the station's Web site at http://www.q1043.com/ as well as through the site's podcast library.


A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr. Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

The book is rich in photos of tender moments with Ringo, his loving relationship with his children, his playfulness and their travels around the world. Her years with the famous Beatle drummer brought Andrews and her highly original and perceptive camerawork into the world of some of the greatest rock and roll and pop icons of the time, along with the women who loved them. Among many others appearing in the images and text of the book, in addition to Ringo and the late, great John Lennon and George Harrison, are Keith Moon, Bernie Taupin, Arlo Guthrie, Hoyt Axton and Eric Clapton, to name a few

A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll is being issued by Dalton Watson Fine Books (www.daltonwatson.com) in a limited edition of 2,500. Priced at $69, it contains 292 pages, 207 color and 98 black and white photos, numbered and signed by Andrews, in a slipcase. It will debut at The Fest for Beatles Fans 2008 at the Meadowlands Hotel in Secaucus, New Jersey from March 28-30, 2008. The author will be on hand at the hotel to autograph books on Friday, 5pm-midnight; Saturday, noon-midnight; and Sunday, noon-10:30 pm. A regular edition will be released in June, 2008 for $39. ISBN # 978-1-85443-235-3.

According to Andrews, “Ringo Starr was also ardent about photography. It was a huge part of our life.” They collaborated on two album covers, Ringo the 4th and Bad Boy, as well as the advertising shoot for his “Ringo” special.

An exhibition of Andrews’s photo portraits of musicians from the 1970s selected from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll will be on view at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. April 12, 2008; The Ingleside Inn and Melvyn’s in Palm Springs, Calif. April 13-14; the June Kelly Gallery in SoHo, New York from June 11-14 and at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville from July 13 to August 31. A national gallery and museum tour is being planned.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Excerpt from "A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll"


John Lennon excerpt from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll

By Nancy Lee Andrews


Ringo Starr wasn't the first Beatle in my life – that place is held by John Lennon. John and May Pang, his and Yoko’s secretary, moved from New York to Los Angeles in the fall of 1973 and were looking for a place to stay. Lou Adler, my boss at the time, offered his palatial Beverly Hills home for a few months. Having a Beatle in residence was a notch on his belt and provided him a lifetime of bragging rights.

Scribes and historians described this period as John's “Lost Weekend,” but I saw nothing to bolster that claim. During this time when John was with May, he was on a creative and productive streak. That eighteen-month period saw the creation of Rock ‘n’ Roll, Walls and Bridges and Pussycats as well as collaborations with Ringo Starr, Harry Nilsson, Elton John and David Bowie. The man was busy and anything but lost.

The three of us spent a lot of time hanging out in the studio (John was recording Rock 'n' Roll with Phil Spector), listening to music at the Troubador where Linda Ronstadt and the Eagles were regulars. He also enjoyed the eclectic offerings of Los Angeles. One night we went to a Bruce Lee movie at midnight with Bob Dylan. John loved eating at funky Chinese restaurants downtown because the food was great or getting hot dogs at Pinks or waiting in line for a delicious burrito from a Mexican stand. There was an unspoken understanding that a camera was not part of the comfort zone when he was among friends. It was about sharing time creatively that John loved.


On the other hand, John understood more than any other artist I knew how to convey his message through the media. John possessed one of the quickest minds, had a great wit and a big heart. He was on a higher metaphysical plane than anyone I had ever met. If you wanted to be around John, you checked your “bullshit” at the door or be prepared to get caustically busted. It’s no wonder that he and Harry Nilsson connected on so many levels, musically, politically and the heart. The Pussycats album was the ferment of these two great artists at that time… a classic.

John introduced me to one of the great loves of my life and for that I will be forever grateful. He saw a union between Ringo and me that could have been something to stand the test of time. Time is relative, time is what it is and for however long it lasts you drink it up, drain the cup and smile. I think that’s what John would say if he were here.

John Lennon came, he saw and he conquered, leaving a mark on our souls, some deeper on others. I love my personal mark he gave me. It’s extraordinary, but the night I got the phone call that John had died I was on my way out the door for some of that tasty Chinese food he so loved.
To order A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, go to www.daltonwatson.com. To see more pictures, go to www.adoseofrocknroll.com.

A Dose of Joey Reynolds


Nancy Lee Andrews appears on Joey Reynolds Show March 11


Photographer Nancy Lee Andrews will appear on the Joey Reynolds Show 1 a.m. Tuesday, March 11 to promote her new book A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll. Reynolds is the host of the popular radio show, which is on WOR radio.


A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr. Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

The book is rich in photos of tender moments with Ringo, his loving relationship with his children, his playfulness and their travels around the world. Her years with the famous Beatle drummer brought Andrews and her highly original and perceptive camerawork into the world of some of the greatest rock and roll and pop icons of the time, along with the women who loved them. Among many others appearing in the images and text of the book, in addition to Ringo and the late, great John Lennon and George Harrison, are Keith Moon, Bernie Taupin, Arlo Guthrie, Hoyt Axton and Eric Clapton, to name a few

A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll is being issued by Dalton Watson Fine Books (www.daltonwatson.com) in a limited edition of 2,500. Priced at $69, it contains 292 pages, 207 color and 98 black and white photos, numbered and signed by Andrews, in a slipcase. It will debut at The Fest for Beatles Fans 2008 at the Meadowlands Hotel in Secaucus, New Jersey from March 28-30, 2008. The author will be on hand at the hotel to autograph books on Friday, 5pm-midnight; Saturday, noon-midnight; and Sunday, noon-10:30 pm. A regular edition will be released in June, 2008 for $39. ISBN # 978-1-85443-235-3.

Nancy Lee Andrews grew up between Jersey City and Alabama. She has worked notably and successfully on both sides of the camera. As a Ford model, she posed for legendary fashion photographers Richard Avedon, Milton Greene, Burt Stern and Irving Penn. Over the years of modeling she became increasingly interested in how the camera “captured the moment.” Greene, realizing her potential, gave her a Nikon camera and some film and told her to “start shooting.” Under his guidance, and from that first roll of film, she was hooked.

According to Andrews, “Ringo Starr was also ardent about photography. It was a huge part of our life.” They collaborated on two album covers, Ringo the 4th and Bad Boy, as well as the advertising shoot for his “Ringo” special.

In her book, Andrews captures the moment in words as well as images. Here’s a brief sample, about a day in George Harrison’s house. “George looked at me and said, 'Nancy, I want to give you something.' He took out a bowl of Indian cabochon blood rubies and told me to take as many as I wanted and design something for myself. I was astounded and asked for paper and pencil and started sorting through the rubies. Some were small and others ranged to the size of quail eggs. As George strummed the guitar and chatted with Ringo, I feverishly drew a design and showed it to the boys. George smiled and looked at Ringo and said, 'Alright, I've given Nancy the stones, now you can give her the gold.’” Later, Ringo had a necklace made by Aspreys, the Queen of England's jewelers.

An exhibition of Andrews’s photo portraits of musicians from the 1970s selected from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll will be on view at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. April 12, 2008; The Ingleside Inn and Melvyn’s in Palm Springs, Calif. April 13-14; the June Kelly Gallery in SoHo, New York from June 11-14 and at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville from July 13 to August 31. A national gallery and museum tour is being planned.

Monday, March 10, 2008

Nancy Lee Andrews and May Pang to appear on the Joey Reynolds Show March 10-11



Nancy Lee Andrews and May Pang promote dual photo books

Rock photographer Nancy Lee Andrews and artist May Pang will appear together on the Joey Reynolds Show, WOR Radio, New York City, on March 10-11. The two will be interviewed live by Reynolds from midnight to 1 a.m. March 10. The show will repeat again on March 11.

Andrews will promote her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll (Dalton Watson Fine Books) a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr while Pang is promoting Instamatic Karma (St. Martin's Press), chronicling her 18-month relationship with John Lennon.

Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

To order A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, visit www.daltonwatson.com. To order Instamatic Karma, go to www.amazon.com. For more information, go to www.adoseofrocknroll.com and www.maypang.com.

Saturday, March 8, 2008

2nd annual Steve McQueen Days March 28-29



Steve McQueen fans from around the world will gather in Slater, Missouri, the actor’s boyhood hometown, to celebrate the life and work of the legendary actor on Friday and Saturday, March 28 and 29.

The 2nd Annual Steve McQueen Days is timed around the actor’s birthday; McQueen would have been 78 years old on March 24th. McQueen was born in Beech Grove, Indiana but moved to Slater, when he was an infant and remained there for most of the next decade. Slater is located in central Missouri in Saline County and has approximately 2,100 residents.


Among those attending will be McQueen’s widow, Barbara McQueen, who will be signing copies of her book Steve McQueen: The Last Mile about her years with McQueen. Also attending will be McQueen’s friend from his early days in Greenwich Village and later, in Hollywood, Richard Martin. Martin has just produced a documentary on McQueen’s life titled An American Rebel. The film is based on the book Steve McQueen: Portrait of an American Rebel by noted biographer Marshall Terrill, who will be a key speaker during the festivities in Slater.


McQueen’s stuntman, Loren Janes, who worked with McQueen throughout his professional career from his television western series, Wanted: Dead or Alive to the last film he made, The Hunter will be presenting rare behind the scenes footage from Nevada Smith and The Sand Pebbles.


Highlights of the festival will include a Steve McQueen Lookalike Contest and a Classic Car and Motorcycle Show. McQueen was an accomplished and competitive semi-professional car and motorcycle racer who owned over 100 antique motorcycles. An auction of McQueen-related memorabilia to benefit the Boy’s Republic School in Chino, California will also be held during the weekend. McQueen attended the Boy’s Republic shortly after he left Slater and continued to visit and support the school throughout his life.

McQueen was a worldwide box-office champion in the '60s and '70s and starred in such blockbuster films as The Great Escape, Papillon and The Sand Pebbles, which garnered him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. This year also marks the 40th Anniversary of Bullitt and The Thomas Crown Affair, which are among McQueen’s most acclaimed films. At the time of his death in November of 1980 from asbestos-induced cancer, McQueen was the most-popular and highest-paid actor in the world.

For additional information about the 2nd Annual Steve McQueen Days visit www.cityofslater.com.

# # #

A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll by Nancy Lee Andrews




"A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll"
(Dalton Watson Fine Books, $69.99)
Nancy Lee Andrews Shares Photos About Her Life with Ringo Starr


George, Jackie Stewart, and Ringo. Photo by Nancy Lee Andrews.

“Ringo Starr wasn't the first Beatle in my life – that place is held by John Lennon.”

Thus begins the text about John Lennon by photographer Nancy Lee Andrews in her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr. Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

The book is rich in photos of tender moments with Ringo, his loving relationship with his children, his playfulness and their travels around the world. Her years with the famous Beatle drummer brought Andrews and her highly original and perceptive camerawork into the world of some of the greatest rock and roll and pop icons of the time, along with the women who loved them. Among many others appearing in the images and text of the book, in addition to Ringo and the late, great John Lennon and George Harrison, are Keith Moon, Bernie Taupin, Arlo Guthrie, Hoyt Axton and Eric Clapton, to name a few.

To order A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, visit www.daltonwatson.com. To learn more about Nancy Lee Andrews and her current photo exhibit and book tour, go to www.adoseofrocknroll.com.

Thursday, March 6, 2008

A Dose of Rock and Roll is released

Press release for A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll

“Ringo Starr wasn't the first Beatle in my life – that place is held by John Lennon.”

Thus begins the text about John Lennon by photographer Nancy Lee Andrews in her new book, A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll, a photographic essay about her life with Ringo Starr. Andrews met Ringo through Lennon who introduced them in May of 1974. The photographs, taken over a decade starting in 1970, are a personal journey through her life at the peak of pop culture history.

The book is rich in photos of tender moments with Ringo, his loving relationship with his children, his playfulness and their travels around the world. Her years with the famous Beatle drummer brought Andrews and her highly original and perceptive camerawork into the world of some of the greatest rock and roll and pop icons of the time, along with the women who loved them. Among many others appearing in the images and text of the book, in addition to Ringo and the late, great John Lennon and George Harrison, are Keith Moon, Bernie Taupin, Arlo Guthrie, Hoyt Axton and Eric Clapton, to name a few.

A Dose of Rock ‘n’ Roll is being issued by Dalton Watson Fine Books (www.daltonwatson.com) in a limited edition of 2,500. Priced at $69, it contains 292 pages, 207 color and 98 black and white photos, numbered and signed by Andrews, in a slipcase. It will debut at The Fest for Beatles Fans 2008 at the Meadowlands Hotel in Secaucus, New Jersey from March 28-30, 2008. The author will be on hand at the hotel to autograph books on Friday, 5pm-midnight; Saturday, noon-midnight; and Sunday, noon-10:30 pm. A regular edition will be released in June, 2008 for $39. ISBN # 978-1-85443-235-3.

Nancy Lee Andrews grew up between Jersey City and Alabama. She has worked notably and successfully on both sides of the camera. As a Ford model, she posed for legendary fashion photographers Richard Avedon, Milton Greene, Burt Stern and Irving Penn. Over the years of modeling she became increasingly interested in how the camera “captured the moment.” Greene, realizing her potential, gave her a Nikon camera and some film and told her to “start shooting.” Under his guidance, and from that first roll of film, she was hooked.

According to Andrews, “Ringo Starr was also ardent about photography. It was a huge part of our life.” They collaborated on two album covers, Ringo the 4th and Bad Boy, as well as the advertising shoot for his “Ringo” TV special.

In her book, Andrews captures the moment in words as well as images. Here’s a brief sample, about a day in George Harrison’s house. “George looked at me and said, 'Nancy, I want to give you something.' He took out a bowl of Indian cabochon blood rubies and told me to take as many as I wanted and design something for myself. I was astounded and asked for paper and pencil and started sorting through the rubies. Some were small and others ranged to the size of quail eggs. As George strummed the guitar and chatted with Ringo, I feverishly drew a design and showed it to the boys. George smiled and looked at Ringo and said, 'Alright, I've given Nancy the stones, now you can give her the gold.’” Later, Ringo had a necklace made by Aspreys, the Queen of England's jewelers.

An exhibition of Andrews’s photo portraits of musicians from the 1970s selected from A Dose of Rock 'n' Roll will be on view at Rock Star Gallery in Scottsdale, Ariz. April 12, 2008; The Ingleside Inn and Melvyn’s in Palm Springs, Calif. April 13-14; the June Kelly Gallery in SoHo, New York from June 11-14 and at the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville from July 13 to August 31. A national gallery and museum tour is being planned.

2nd annual Steve McQueen Days March 28-29

2nd Annual Steve McQueen Days

Steve McQueen fans from around the world will gather in Slater, Missouri, the actor’s boyhood hometown, to celebrate the life and work of the legendary actor on Friday and Saturday, March 28th and 29th

The 2nd Annual Steve McQueen Days is timed around the actor’s birthday; McQueen would have been 78 years old on March 24th. McQueen was born in Beech Grove, Indiana but moved to Slater, when he was an infant and remained there for most of the next decade. Slater is located in central Missouri in Saline County and has approximately 2,100 residents.

Among those attending will be McQueen’s widow, Barbara McQueen, who will be signing copies of her book Steve McQueen: The Last Mile about her years with McQueen. Also attending will be McQueen’s friend from his early days in Greenwich Village and later, in Hollywood, Richard Martin. Martin has just produced a documentary on McQueen’s life titled An American Rebel. The film is based on the book Steve McQueen: Portrait of an American Rebel by noted biographer Marshall Terrill, who will be a key speaker during the festivities in Slater.

McQueen’s stuntman, Loren Janes, who worked with McQueen throughout his professional career from his television western series, Wanted: Dead or Alive to the last film he made, The Hunter will be presenting rare behind the scenes footage from Nevada Smith and The Sand Pebbles.



Highlights of the festival will include a Steve McQueen Lookalike Contest and a Classic Car and Motorcycle Show. McQueen was an accomplished and competitive semi-professional car and motorcycle racer who owned over 120 antique motorcycles. An auction of McQueen-related memorabilia to benefit the Boy’s Republic School in Chino, California will also be held during the weekend. McQueen attended the Boy’s Republic shortly after he left Slater and continued to visit and support the school throughout his life.

McQueen was a worldwide box-office champion in the ’60s and ’70s and starred in such blockbuster films as The Great Escape, Papillon and The Sand Pebbles, which garnered him an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. This year also marks the 40th Anniversary of Bullitt and The Thomas Crown Affair, which are among McQueen’s most acclaimed films. At the time of his death in November of 1980 from asbestos-induced cancer, McQueen was the most-popular and highest-paid actor in the world.

For additional information about the 2nd Annual Steve McQueen Days visit www.cityofslater.com.